Caruso-Cabrera – Dumb as Bag of Hammers

In this video, you can see CNBC talking head Michelle Caruso-Cabrera saying that it’s OK for manufacturing jobs to be sent to Asia because they are beneath Americans. Her position is that Joe Sixpack should stop hitting things with hammers inside of factories and go work as a scientist at a bio-tech firm.

OK, there are plenty of smart people who work in factories. And maybe Caruso-Cabrera is right; maybe they should be turned out of their jobs, and forced to go through ten years of higher education to prepare for their new careers as rocket scientists.

But what about the dumb people? Not everybody is smart, you know. Not everybody can “use their brain” to “move up the job value chain.” The fact is that repetitive assembly-line jobs that don’t require higher thought are an ideal way for dumb people to earn a living.

Note to Caruso-Cabrera: when you go to small town, take its only factory and send it to China, THE DUMB PEOPLE DO NOT GO WITH IT. What do you suggest they do for a living now that you have applied your economic genius to their town?

In addition to advocating the export of factory jobs while the USA suffers double-digit unemployment, Caruso-Cabrera also advocates the importation of engineers and programmers via H1-B visas. Brilliant strategy: export jobs, import workers.

Speaking of H1-B visas, isn’t it time that CNBC was outsourced? Why not start with Caruso-Cabrera? She works on the stock-market channel and can’t even pronounce the word “stock”. Instead, she says “stalk”, like she is talking about celery or something. Shouldn’t CNBC bring over an Indian woman on an H1-B visa to replace Caruso-Cabrera? I’m sure that a smart, young, attractive Indian woman who can pronounce “stock” could easily be found. And she will work for 10% of what Caruso-Cabrera makes. C’mon GE, its time to boost your profits some more with another “cost control”.

Also in the video, they are carrying on about how their boss GE CEO Jeff Immelt made some comments about how the USA should do more manufacturing. The talking heads even “challenged” the professor guest to figure out a way to do it. Can you imagine the hypocrisy? It was Corporate America that rammed the free-trade laws with low-wage countries like China and India through Congress in unconstitutional “fast track” style for the sole purpose of exporting jobs. Now GE/CNBC is acting like they are some sort of champion for American workers.

Please.

16 Responses to “Caruso-Cabrera – Dumb as Bag of Hammers”

  1. Mitch says:

    Matt:
    How can I say this in a nice way? She seems really quite unsympathetic. Arrogant folks never see the end until it’s too late. I hope she’s invested wisely. She could be a useful addition to CNBC as it draws latinos but it seems she’s too busy being stuck in her dead-end ideology.

  2. George says:

    “Caruso-Cabrera – Dumb as Bag of Hammers”

    FYI, it hurts when I laugh.

    The bothersome part of this video wasn’t the video but one of the headline news flashed at the bottom: “Rep Frank wants bill to outlaw excessive risk by Wall Streeters”.

    “Risk”, and the freedom to persue it, is what made this country great. I risked all I had to open an electronics store (which became very successful – I could have lost on that deal but ended up making me and the government a huge chunk of change); there is a risk each time the Shuttle heads for outer space; George Lucas risked everything ($) he had to make Star Wars; there’s a risk each time we go to war; TARP is a huge risk; risk when the Fed raises or lowers interest rates; and so forth.

    I suppose the key word in that headline is “excessive”. That’s a neat way for the lawmakers to cover themselves. Next they will add “justification” or risk/reward to the equation with 3,000 pages of hyperbabble that allows them to shape it to meet the requirements of their special interest groups and lobbyist supporters.

    What we have here is a slippery slope. The incremental loss of financial and associated freedoms. This is a “thief in the night”. A sad sign of the times.

  3. George says:

    From Incredible Charts Trading Diary:

    The good news is that, according to the Obama administration, the rich will pay for everything. The bad news is that, according to the Obama administration, you’re rich.

    ~ P. J. O’Rourke

    http://astore.amazon.com/incrediblecha-20/detail/0802139701

  4. Larry says:

    Global markets rallied on Thursday after China’s Central Bank reaffirmed loose monetary policy.
    This is madness.

  5. Dressguard says:

    Leonidas: No, this is WallSt. :mrgreen:

  6. K says:

    up day today?

  7. George says:

    K,

    Man, who knows? Chances are higher for a down day if consolidation continues. SPY has been consolidating the past few days to work off its oversold condition on the daily. After that, most likely up based upon the weekly.

  8. George says:

    Anyone having problems with Scottrade? It isn’t filling in charts properly and some, not at all.

  9. George says:

    K,

    What are your pivots for today?

  10. after says:

    Matt, all, if you like novels, here is one that I read years back, relates to mfg. job losses in a way, this from the authors website:
    The Keepers of Truth

    Booker Prize 2000 shortlist
    Impac Prize 2002 shortlist
    Irish Novel of the Year 2000
    New York Times Notable Book of the Year 1993

    The last of a manufacturing dynasty in a dying industrial town, Bill lives alone in the family mansion and works for the Truth, the moribund local paper. He yearns to write long philosophical pieces about the American dream gone sour, not the flaccid write-ups of bake-off contests demanded by the Truth. Then, old man Lawton goes missing, and suspicion fixes on his son, Ronny. Paradoxically, the specter of violent death breathes new life into the town. For Bill, a deeper and more disturbing involvement with the Lawtons ensues. The Lawton murder and the obsessions it awakes in the town come to symbolize the mood of a nation on the edge. Compulsively readable, The Keepers of Truth startles both with its insights and with Collins’s powerful, incisive writing.

  11. Yerk says:

    Not related to trading… Folks something is broken in the US. A friend wants to send his daughter for one year as an exchange student to a high school in CT. To get the formula to apply for the visa you have to go through external service providers designated by the US govt. They do not much (if you organize a guest family and a school yourself) but charge a whopping 5.000€. So some third parties get a license to print money from the US govt to alienate those interested in the country. Bewildering.

  12. Stringm says:

    Joe Sixpack is a term not a reality. Joe buys 30 packs, no one can afford sixpacks except executives. Saw a stat the other day that 1% of US people make 1/3 of the income.

    String

  13. Mitch says:

    Yerk:

    >>>external service providers designated by the US govt.

    That may be some of the privatization of some gov’t agencies. Not always a bad thing but that sounds expensive. I’m going to look into that. I’ve arranged work related visa’s from the U.S. out for next to nothing in cost. Other than the student being less than an adult I can’t imagine why this intermediary is paid so handsomely.